Cutting tool consumption continues to run counter to the trend for manufacturersrsquo durable goods shipments  a pattern that emerged late in 2013
<p>Cutting tool consumption continues to run counter to the trend for manufacturers&rsquo; durable goods shipments, a pattern that emerged late in 2013.</p>

U.S. Cutting Tool Consumption Wavering Again

February total ices robust demand recorded in the January report Joint report by AMT, USCTI &ldquo;An upward climb &hellip;&rdquo;

Cutting tool consumption continues to run counter to the trend for manufacturers’ durable goods shipments, a pattern that emerged late in 2013.

In February, consumption of cutting tools by U.S. machine shops and other manufacturers slipped slightly from the January total — down 1.2%, from $158 million to a new total of $157 million — and more so from the year-ago result from February 2013.  The new figure is 6.8% less than the total recorded for February 2013.

The results are drawn from the latest U.S. Cutting Tool Market Report, issued jointly by the U.S. Cutting Tool Institute and AMT – The Association For Manufacturing Technology.

The USCTR is a monthly report based on actual sale of cutting tool products, as reported by participating suppliers who represent about 80% of the domestic market for cutting tools.

“The trend is certainly on an upward climb as incoming orders have indicated a strong finish for the first quarter of the calendar year,” according to USCTI president Tom Haag.

The USCTR is a recently developed report that AMT and USCTI introduced less than a year ago, calling it their “first step” to promote and support domestic manufacturers of cutting tools. The lack of a long history of reporting makes it difficult to judge trends in the market.

However, the new result resumes a wavering sequence in the monthly reporting. While January totals indicated a robust improvement after two months of decline, it’s possible that the February report is an indicator of a short month and/or weather-impaired manufacturing activity.

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