Finishing to the micro level

Finishing to the micro level

A new technology is competing against superfinishing when smoothing the surfaces of gears, bearings, and other load-bearing metal components that require precision wear surfaces. Developed by the Surface Finishing Division of Houghton International Inc.,

Houghton's MicroSurfacing process produces superior wear surfaces for gears and other load-bearing metal components.


A new technology is competing against superfinishing when smoothing the surfaces of gears, bearings, and other load-bearing metal components that require precision wear surfaces. Developed by the Surface Finishing Division of Houghton International Inc., Valley Forge, Pa., MicroSurfacing reduces the need to use abrasives like aluminum oxide, silicon carbide, quartz, and graphite to remove burrs, scales/oxide, and refine wear surfaces.

According to Houghton, MicroSurfacing is a cost-effective alternative to mechanical manufacturing operations like surface grinding, lapping, and shot blasting. It reportedly produces wear surfaces with a topology equal to or better than that of components that have gone through a run-in period or been manganese-phosphate coated. And the optimum surface is accomplished without the wait or additional cost of coating.

While Houghton initially targeted the gear and bearing industries, the company has found that other industrial components can benefit from MicroSurfacing. These include conveyor chains, precision washers, forge dies, cast iron piston sleeves, camshafts, crankshafts, engine valves, and hydraulic pumps. The technology also works on components such as hydraulic/pneumatic shafts, injection-mold dies, and springs.

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