Slide rule cool in 1904

Slide rule cool in 1904

In the December 1, 1904, issue, a reader thanked the editors for introducing him to the slide rule. "Having heard it spoken of (in print that is) by one whom I believed to be thoroughly practical as being a good labor-saving device, I got one, and it has

In the December 1, 1904, issue, a reader thanked the editors for introducing him to the slide rule. "Having heard it spoken of (in print that is) by one whom I believed to be thoroughly practical as being a good labor-saving device, I got one, and it has been a great satisfaction," he wrote.

He also enthused, "It is a greater saver of time and of mutual effort . . . a tool for the busy man who can safely do with it calculations that he would not have time to do in the ordinary way."


Too many engineers

Editors discussed the "alarm" in Berlin about the overproduction of trained engineers. The December 22 issue described how the competition for work was driving down wages. "This is advantageous to the country at large, as it enables individuals to compete more easily against foreigners who have to pay their skilled engineers much higher salaries." Engineers, however, were concerned about the "minimum living wage" they were earning and were considering organizing to fix the matter.


"Pennies for photos save dollars in delay"

This was the headline for an article in the December 6, 1954, issue, which described a quick and easy way to record setups and tools. A Massachusetts shop shared the idea of using a Polaroid "Land" Camera-Model 95 to snap shots of the shop floor.

"Basically the difference between this camera and all other cameras is: one minute after you have taken the picture, you have the finished print in your hand," commented the author of the piece.

He was all agog at the thought of having the photo in hand so quickly — as well as the idea of being able to take another photo if the first one didn't turn out right.


Inner-city flight and suburban sprawl

The December 20 issue described how manufacturers Timken and Cincinnati Milling moved their Cleveland sales offices to suburban areas. Citing rising rents, traffic, and parking problems as concerns, editors also wrote about another major problem: "Many married women will work near home, but they will not 'commute' into town."

TAGS: CMM and QC
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