Idea runs rings around base-mounting problem

Idea runs rings around base-mounting problem

Locating a convenient spot for mounting a magnetic indicator base to a milling machine is often next to impossible. To eliminate this time-consuming task, I use a carbon-steel ring with three small plates attached that fastens to quill housings on Bridgep

Locating a convenient spot for mounting a magnetic indicator base to a milling machine is often next to impossible. To eliminate this time-consuming task, I use a carbon-steel ring with three small plates attached that fastens to quill housings on Bridgeport-type mills. Three setscrews allow for adjustment and hold the setup in place.

Counter-sunk machine screws secure the plates, which provide a flat working surface. The ring front is cut to accommodate machine-quill housings.

I also have a ring for Cincinnati-type mills. The ring is 5 /8-in. thick and 5 /8-in. wide with 1 1 /2-in. flats machined at 120° for a Bridgeport and 90° for a Cincinnati. About 0.005 in. of clearance on the ring's I.D. provides a close fit. I not only use the setup for indicator bases but also for coolant wands.

Lonnie Johnson
Rock Springs, Wyo.


Lining up an accurate angle

My idea accurately sets the longitudinal slide of a universal milling machine — in minutes instead of degree increments — for cutting helix angles. What I do is extend the machine's zero line up to the end of the cross slide using a scriber. After marking this line "0," I scribe a "B" line parallel to and at a suitable distance from the "0" line. With the longitudinal slide in the horizontal position, I measure an "A" distance using dial calipers and note the reading.

I then calculate the required dimension for a desired helix angle and set the caliper depth to that dimension plus the "A" dimension. This is done with the calipers at the pre-scribed "B" line ("A" plus calculated dimension equals "C").

Navjot Singh
East Punjab, India

Pick the winning Practical Idea!

Select the best Practical Idea in this issue by circling the associated number on the reader service card. Winners receive an award of $100. An honorarium is paid for each item published in this column. Submitted ideas are subject to editing, and sketches will be drawn to conform to AM's style and format. Submission of clear, close-up photos is encouraged.

Send material to Practical Ideas, AMERICAN MACHINIST, Penton Media Inc., 1300 E. 9th St., Cleveland, OH 44114-1503. Please include your name, address, zip code, and Social Security number.

Winner for May 2004: Cal Valentine, "The latest in edgefinder repair," p. 62.

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