Cutting tool consumption continues to run counter to the trend for manufacturersrsquo durable goods shipments  a pattern that emerged late in 2013

Cutting tool consumption continues to run counter to the trend for manufacturers’ durable goods shipments, a pattern that emerged late in 2013.

U.S. Cutting Tool Consumption Wavering Again

February total ices robust demand recorded in the January report Joint report by AMT, USCTI “An upward climb …”

Cutting tool consumption continues to run counter to the trend for manufacturers’ durable goods shipments, a pattern that emerged late in 2013.

In February, consumption of cutting tools by U.S. machine shops and other manufacturers slipped slightly from the January total — down 1.2%, from $158 million to a new total of $157 million — and more so from the year-ago result from February 2013.  The new figure is 6.8% less than the total recorded for February 2013.

The results are drawn from the latest U.S. Cutting Tool Market Report, issued jointly by the U.S. Cutting Tool Institute and AMT – The Association For Manufacturing Technology.

The USCTR is a monthly report based on actual sale of cutting tool products, as reported by participating suppliers who represent about 80% of the domestic market for cutting tools.

“The trend is certainly on an upward climb as incoming orders have indicated a strong finish for the first quarter of the calendar year,” according to USCTI president Tom Haag.

The USCTR is a recently developed report that AMT and USCTI introduced less than a year ago, calling it their “first step” to promote and support domestic manufacturers of cutting tools. The lack of a long history of reporting makes it difficult to judge trends in the market.

However, the new result resumes a wavering sequence in the monthly reporting. While January totals indicated a robust improvement after two months of decline, it’s possible that the February report is an indicator of a short month and/or weather-impaired manufacturing activity.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish