Pratt amp Whitney is one of the largest suppliers of jet engines to US Dept of Defense programs including the F135 turbofan engine developed for the F35 Lightning II a singleengine variant of the Joint Strike Fighter with stealth capability

Pratt & Whitney is one of the largest suppliers of jet engines to U.S. Dept. of Defense programs, including the F135 turbofan engine developed for the F-35 Lightning II, a single-engine variant of the Joint Strike Fighter with stealth capability.

Pratt & Whitney Cuts Another 400 Positions

+1,400 jobs cut in 2013 “Necessary to manage cost structure”

Pratt & Whitney estimated its salaried workforce reduction would affect 400 positions company-wide, effective immediately. The numbers include approximately 200 positions in Connecticut, where the jet engine builder is headquartered.

It described the job cuts as “necessary actions to manage our cost structure,” and also noted it is investing in new programs that will offer long-term advantages to the company, its employees, customers, and investors.

The company offered no specific cause for the cuts, but it’s understood that current and anticipated reductions in U.S. defense spending are affecting major defense suppliers. Spirit AeroSystems, which is a supplier of composite airframe structures, is going through a cost-saving process that has included layoffs and plant sales.

P&W manufacturers several different fighter-jet engines, including the F100, F117, F119, and F135, as well as HPW3000 helicopter engines.

The company also produces commercial jet engines and aerospace power/propulsion systems. Pratt & Whitney officials also have noted that commercial aircraft operators are reducing their spares purchases, which is reducing another important source of its revenues.

In July, Pratt & Whitney reported 575 employees had accepted a voluntary early-retirement offer, and in January of this year it laid off 350 salaried workers and 80 hourly workers.

“While the company is very pleased with the number of employees who participated in its recent voluntary separation program,” it said in a statement, “these further reductions are necessary.”

It said, “continuously assesses staffing levels to ensure they are in line with current business and economic conditions.”

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish