VIP, October 2005

VIP, October 2005

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October 18 , 2005
Your newsletter for tips on selecting manufacturing technology.
In this Issue...
Sponsored by FARO Technologies

1.) Question of the month --- Do you expect manufacturing growth in 2006?
2.) Tips on Toolholding
3.) Hot products
4.) Manufacturing education and training - Free Training to Keep Tooling Jobs in North America


Last chance to register for American Machinist's complimentary Webcast:






Newsletter sponsor


With over 8,500 installations, FARO is the world's single source for a
complete line of portable CAM2 solutions for everyone from machinists
requiring .0002"-accuracy to manufacturers testing huge components. The
FARO Gage, FaroArm, Laser ScanArm, Laser Scanner LS and Laser Tracker X &
Xi: Cost-effective PCMMs to improve your products & profitability. Click here to learn more.

Question of the month
Do you expect manufacturing growth in 2006?
Growth in manufacturing is expected, and manufacturers are predicting that the worldwide drain on manufacturing jobs caused by China soon will reach equilibrium. This outlook emphasizes the need for increased efficiency and productivity improvements to stay competitive. Bruce Vernyi, editor-in-chief, would like your response to these forecasts, along with predictions of your own or ideas on how your company intends to meet new challenges expected in 2006. Send Bruce Vernyi, AM's Editor-in-Chief your opinion, story, questions, comments, or suggestions.



Online Product Demonstration

If you are considering a shop management and control solution, take a
close look at the industry leader: JobBOSS. Click here to view a FREE 10-minute audio overview or interactive demo. If you have any questions, you can speak with a JobBOSS representative at 800-777-4334

Tips on Selecting
Toolholding

To view the latest articles and products on Toolholding, visit American Machinist's Toolholding Tech Zone.

Effective toolholding is one key to achieving the speed and accuracy made possible by today's advanced machines and cutting tools. However, many manufacturers continue to use old toolholders in new machine spindles. This practice can hold back the performance benefits offered by new machines, and may result in the improper fit of toolholders that the company purchases later.

Shops that are preparing to buy new toolholders should keep four critical criteria in mind:

• Rigidity is achieved by at least 80 percent taper contact.

• Accuracy is determined by a maximum runout of 0.0002 inches total indicator runout (also known as TIR, a measure of the deviation between the surface of a rotating cylinder and a reference axis) at four times the diameter of the tool being held. Shank tolerances of ANSI standard AT-3 or better increase spindle-taper accuracy.

• Balance decreases vibration and chatter, and increases metal-removal rates, tool life and surface finishes. The quality of toolholders that use set screws or collets affects balance at high spindle speeds, and should consistently maintain a G 2.5 rating at the rated spindle speed.

• Gripping power is the holding power of the toolholder. Multipurpose, high-precision collets should have a wide clamping range with a 1-mm collapse.

There has been an increasing trend toward HSK and shrinkfit toolholders because of their inherent rigidity and accuracy. HSK holders should meet required tolerances when a spindle is running at 40,000 rpm. Shrinkfit toolholders are expensive but they achieve rigidity at nearly the same levels as an integral shank tool, and at a lower cost and with greater flexibility than possible with an integral shank tool. Shrinkfit toolholders impose 10,000 pounds of gripping force on a tool shank, exceeding the gripping capabilities of collet, milling and hydraulic chucks. Shrinkfit tooling should be purchased from a supplier licensed by the original patent holder to ensure the product is manufactured to the correct standards; look for the high holding power and the extreme rigidity that are necessary for precise machining; ensure the toolholder is factory balanced to 15,000 rpm or better, and demand a TIR of 0.0002 inches or better.


Hot Products

New Compact, Fast, 5X VMC with High Volumetric Accuracy


Mitsui Seiki's Vertex 550-5X is the new machine with Mitsui's legendary precision, a compact footprint, ample work envelope for complex parts, and a competitive price.


The Rules of Manufacturing Have Changed.




Experience the New Rules at Innovation Days November 3-4, 2005.
Visit www.digitalmachinetool.com for more information.


Banner's EZ-SCREEN Guarding System guards areas and perimeters without a controller and starts at only $795.
Check it out




Seco-Carboloy EasyShrink ® 20 Modular Shrinkfit System

Available with or without stop rod height setting, in single or triple stations, air or water-cooled, and choice of rotary support. www.carboloy.com/epb .


Manufacturing Education and Training

Industrial Hydraulics, and Election Drives and Controls
As part of its ongoing effort to increase the competitiveness of North American manufacturing, Cimatron Technologies, Inc., a provider of integrative CAD/CAM software solutions for toolmakers, is offering free training and support to unemployed tooling professionals.

Cimatron is hoping its program will help to improve the North American economy, combat unemployment, and promote higher standards in tooling design and manufacturing through the use of advanced technology. Participation in the program is open to qualified unemployed tooling professionals with industry knowledge and experience. For more information, visit www.cimatrontech.com/events/freetraining .


Coming in November: AMERICAN MACHINIST will focus on Machine Tools.

To learn how to reach this newsletter's thousands of qualified readers, e-mail
Christian Webb or call him at 216.931.9501. To subscribe to this newsletter or manage your account, click here. To unsubscribe click here. © 2005 Penton Media Inc., 1300 E. 9th St., Cleveland, OH 44114. Read our privacy policy.

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