System keeps hose damage from taking off

At a large German airplane refitter, most of the operations involved in converting passenger planes into cargo carriers is done with compressed-air-powered tools, for instance, wrenches and drills. These planes move around the facility, and the working ar

For a safe work environment when converting passenger planes to cargo carriers, a German refitting shop relies on HoseGuard, a damage-control system for hose or pipe rupture.

At a large German airplane refitter, most of the operations involved in converting passenger planes into cargo carriers is done with compressed-air-powered tools, for instance, wrenches and drills. These planes move around the facility, and the working areas on and inside their fuselages constantly change. To make the job easy, the refitting company uses flexible air-supply lines. However, these lines can separate from fittings, be driven over or cut by sharp objects, and damaged by other means. For a safe work environment, the refitting shop incorporates HoseGuard, a damage-control system for hose or pipe rupture.

Like a fuse in an electrical system, HoseGuard detects ruptures and interrupts the main flow (and the full pressure) in a fraction of a sec, and thus, it prevents whiplash and danger from uncontrolled blasts of medium. A minimal residual flow of compressed air ensures that the damaged hose is easily replaced and the new section slowly fills to its operating pressure. Afterwards, the HoseGuard opens for normal operation while the rest of the facility's system remains under full pressure, so there's no shutdown required.

HoseGuard works well for the refitting shop's varying air-supply system. Air feed starts at a 2-in.-diameter main line, which leads to an 8-port manifold and on to 1-in.-diameter hoses. These hoses then channel down to 1 /2 or 1 /4-in.-diameter feeders for the power tools.

CubeAir International
Glashütten, Germany
cubeair.com

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