Ford Launches Engine Plant Expansion

$155-million project for new V-6 engine line in Cleveland

Ford Motor Company has outlined a $155-million investment program for its Cleveland Engine Plant No. 1, to build a new V-6 engine. It’s the latest in a series of investments totaling $1.8 billion Ford has made to support its 2011 product line, in this case for the 2011 Mustang.

The new 3.7-liter V-6 engine is called “fuel efficient” by Ford, which says it expects the 2011 Mustang to achieve 30 miles per gallon on the highway, with 305 horsepower. It is one of nine new or upgraded engines or transmissions for 2011 Ford, Lincoln and Mercury vehicles.

Bill Russo, director of manufacturing for Ford's powertrain operations, said the automaker is "absolutely committed to delivering class-leading fuel efficiency with every new vehicle we introduce, and this investment in Cleveland provides further proof,"

The Cleveland Engine Plant No. 1 already produces two-thirds of all V-6 engines powering Mustangs. The $155 million investment there includes $121 million in manufacturing equipment — developing and re-tooling flexible manufacturing systems in cylinder block, head, and crankshaft finishing and engine assembly areas — and $34 million for launch and engineering.

Sixty new jobs have been added in preparation for launching the new V-6.

"The Cleveland Engine Plant is not only building fuel-efficient engines for some of our most popular Ford products, it's becoming a hub for the future of Ford powertrains," Russo said. "This facility has the flexibility and the expertise to help us meet customer demands for fun, fuel-efficient vehicles, and it represents the future of advanced manufacturing in North America."

Ford said its new investment at the Cleveland Engine Plant is supported by its “green partnership” with the U.S. Dept. of Energy. It is one of 11 Ford plant participating in the federal Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentives Program, which aims to develop advanced technology vehicles.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish