First Dreamliner Set for Delivery

Boeing unveils first commercial model of new jet to All-Nippon Airways

The Boeing Co. unveiled the first Boeing 787 Dreamliner on Saturday, presenting the new commercial jet to its “launch customer” All-Nippon Airways (ANA). The 787 is over two years behind schedule because of various delays in design, production, and testing, but Boeing indicates it has orders for 827 of the new jets and remains confident it will deliver on its promise of greater fuel efficiency than current designs.

The “Dreamliner” is a wide-body twin-engine aircraft with long range and carrying capacity for 210 to 330 passengers. Boeing has said it will be its most fuel-efficient commercial jet, with a structure based on a large volume of composite materials helping to reduce fuel consumption by up to 20% versus similar-size jets. A more advanced aerodynamic design than previous jets, more-electric systems, and modern engines add to the 787’s appeal to airlines.

"The plane is being certified to the highest FAA standards," stated Boeing’s v.p. and general manager for the 787 program, Scott Fancher, "but the real focus of the traveling public will likely be on customer satisfaction and the elegance of the flight.

The 787 jet delivered to ANA is outfitted as a short-haul international jet — Tokyo to Hong Kong — with business- and economy-class cabins. "ANA's passengers will be the first to experience the 787 Dreamliner's comfortable interior environment," according to Mitsuo Morimoto, senior exec. vice president and director of ANA. "Combined with ANA's superior levels of service, passengers will enjoy a spacious interior, larger windows, comfortable seats and touch-panel in-flight entertainment screens."

"Our teams are making outstanding progress in completing the first airplane to be delivered and achieving certification of the 787," Fancher said. "We are inspired by the airline's enthusiasm for this airplane and look forward to the day when we make our first delivery to ANA."

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