15 Facts That Can’t Be Ignored About US Manufacturing

15 Facts That Can’t Be Ignored About US Manufacturing

It has played a key role in shaping and developing the U.S. economy throughout the history of the nation, especially after the start of the Industrial Revolution in the late 1700’s.

Simply defined, manufacturing is the process of transforming raw materials into new products, using mechanical, physical or chemical means. Without manufacturing, we wouldn’t have the tools and technologies needed to be productive in the other sectors of our economy, nor would we have the various goods that consumers use every day.

For example, let’s say that it’s a beautiful Sunday morning, and you have plans to play a round of golf with a friend. In order for that to be possible, a manufacturer needed to forge the club shaft and cut it to the proper length. A separate company, specializing in rubber compounds, would need to create the grip. Someone else would produce the club heads, which rely heavily on manufacturing and design advantages to increase performance. Finally, a technically skilled workforce needs to put it all together.

Of course, you won’t be going anywhere without a car, which requires a whole separate chain of manufacturing events! Sectors such as agriculture, construction and health care also rely heavily on the machinery and tools produced by manufacturers. And as for the health of the U.S. economy itself?

Economists agree that the U.S. wouldn’t be the powerhouse of a country that is it today if not for the manufacturing sector. In fact, without diving into the nitty gritty details, it can be difficult to put into perspective exactly how much of a lasting impact manufacturing has had on the U.S. economy over time. But hey, don’t take our word for it! Check out these 15 facts about U.S. manufacturing that simply can’t be ignored, and draw your own conclusions.

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